Webinar Recording – Providing Power to workers making the invisible visible

Presenter(s): Dr Jennifer Hines is a Certified Occupational Hygienist with over 20 years’ industry experience in the mining, manufacturing and Defence sectors. & Dr Jon Roberts is a Lecturer at UOW in the School of Mechanical, Materials, Mechatronics, and Biomedical Engineering teaching and researching topics relating to mechanical engineering, and bulk materials handling with a focus on simulation methods and dust control, as well as working on industry projects with Bulk Materials Engineering Australia (BMEA).

Recorded 19th May 2023 This webinar will look at virtual reality as a means of helping workers to see what they otherwise cannot.  Virtual reality is an administrative control, that can be used to provide a powerful message to workers to help them reduce their exposure by being able to understand where an unseen hazard exists.  We will look at a case study in an underground coal mine and how the training was developed, providing tips along the way of how this can be achieved.

Presenters:

Dr Jennifer Hines

Dr Jennifer Hines is a Certified Occupational Hygienist with over 20 years’ industry experience in the mining, manufacturing and Defence sectors. She has a Masters in Occupational Hygiene and completed her PhD at the University of Wollongong on “The Role of Emissions Based Maintenance to Reduce Diesel Engine Exhaust, Worker Exposure and Fuel Consumption”.  She is currently a consultant Occupational Hygienist and a Lecturer in the School of Health and Society at the University of Wollongong (UoW). Reducing worker exposure to contaminants and thus preventing occupational illness and disease to workers in the underground mining environment has been a focal point of her career to date.

Dr Jon Roberts

Dr Jon Roberts is a Lecturer at UOW in the School of Mechanical, Materials, Mechatronics, and Biomedical Engineering teaching and researching topics relating to mechanical engineering, and bulk materials handling with a focus on simulation methods and dust control, as well as working on industry projects with Bulk Materials Engineering Australia (BMEA).

Posted on 05/06/2023

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